a 37 Elizabeth St, Kalamunda 6076 p (08)9293 4455 f (08)9257 1183

a 11 Salix Way, Forrestfield 6058 p (08)9453 6566 f (08)9453 3443

Thank you Mead Community for your overwhelmingly generous and kind-hearted response to our previous blog post.  In less than 24 hours our 1 roll of toilet paper multiplied to over a hundred rolls in our overflowing baskets and the donations have continued. Please ask us for a roll if you are in need. Our toilet paper elves will be working hard over the next few weeks distributing to those in our community who can’t get out and about as freely.

Our new Telehealth consultation options can assist in social distancing to prevent community spread of the coronavirus. However in these times of great uncertainty and change it is important that our social retreat does not lead to social isolation. Now more than ever we need to reach out and connect with each other (using no-touch techniques of course) particularly with those who might be alone or anxious. There are many ways we can all do that. Phone a friend. Leave a little card in your neighbour’s letterbox letting them know if or how you could assist them if they were quarantined. Offer to collect someone’s mail, or shopping. Join an online community. Support your local business owners. Or be like the Italians and sing in your streets… and wash your hands.

Your generosity and community spirit continue to inspire us as we deal with coronavirus together. Fear and anxiety can drive us to become self-focussed and inward-looking. When we are afraid we have the tendency to tense against the unknown. It is hard to connect with generosity and open-heartedness when we are shut down and tight. But our global community also needs us. And we will only overcome this by working together. So, be an agent for spreading kindness. Donate blood. Share the dignity and buy an extra packet of sanitary products to add to the collection bins in your local supermarket for distribution to homeless women. Monitor your social media posts and spread love not fear. Ask for help. Be kind to one another… and keep washing your hands.

Mead Medical is pleased to advise you that Medicare now permits Telehealth consults for patients that have attended Mead Medical in the last 12 months and meet the following criteria:

  1. the person has been diagnosed with COVID-19 virus but who is not a patient of a hospital; or
  2. the person has been required to isolate themselves in quarantine in accordance with home isolation guidance issued by Australian Health Protection Principal Committee (AHPPC); or
  3. the person is considered more susceptible to the COVID-19 virus being a person who is:
    1. at least 70 years old; or
    2. at least 50 years old and is of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent; or
    3. is pregnant; or
    4. is a parent of a child under 12 months; or
    5. is already under treatment for chronic health conditions or is immune compromised; or
  4. the person meets the current national triage protocol criteria for suspected COVID-19 infection.

Our current protocol for conducting a Telehealth consultation is via phone commencing today.

Next week video conferencing will be available for selected GPs, which will require you to create a Skype account if you do not have one already.

Our protocol for making a Telehealth appointment is as follows:

  1. Call Mead Medical administration on 9293 4455 with your name, usual doctor, and Skype address or phone number.
  2. You are able to make Telehealth appointments online on HOTDOC.
  3. Please indicate at the time of booking if your consultation is urgent so that an earlier consultation can be arranged if possible.

Toilet paper panic has probably been one of the more interesting and unexpected side effects of the coronavirus. It is a curious phenomenon that warrants further exploration. There are probably few of us who are unaffected. At my home we are down to our last 3 rolls. On my last 5 visits to the supermarket, I’ve not been able to buy more. But I’m a fit, healthy person with access to transport. And if it came down to it, I’d get by with soap and water… And stop shaking hands. Many of our patients at Mead are not so lucky. This week I’ve spoken to a heavily pregnant mum who doesn’t have the energy to drag her two year old around to multiple shopping centres in search of toilet paper. I’ve seen an elderly gentleman who relies on his carer to take him on a shopping outing for an hour once a week, miss out this week because there was no toilet paper to be found. Then there’s the 79 year old woman who urgently needs to prepare for her colonoscopy. But amidst these, there are also stories of hope, such as the 94 yr old patient who had a stranger with surplus, drop off a packet of toilet paper on her doorstep.

There’s no doubt we are living in uncertain times. The information (and misinformation) we receive about Corona virus changes on a daily basis. It seems inevitable that many of us will face a period of self-isolation. So it makes sense that you might want to have an adequate supply of toilet paper. But behind our wanting is a fear of lack, of not having enough. And this fear makes us small. It is a form of suffering that makes us want to hold on and grasp for what we don’t have. Panic buying can be seen as an attempt to assuage the fear, and to gain a sense of control in the vastly and rapidly changing landscape. However it fails to recognise that we are all in this together. We are community. We are connected. If some among us suffer, in the end, we all suffer.

I am inspired by the stories of hope and I invite you remember you are a valued part of our Mead community. I’ve brought one of my remaining toilet rolls and a basket to the reception area in our Kalamunda practice. I’d invite you to share the love… and the date roll or bog roll or whatever Aussie slang name you prefer to call it. Bring a roll to add to the collection. Please, if you have run out, take a roll, knowing that your community has your back… and your bum. With lots of handwashing of course.

Mead Medical staff and Directors would like to wish both Brooke and Tania the best of luck on their new journey in whatever they choose to do, thank you for all of your hard work and dedication to Mead over the years, you will be missed.

ALERT: CORONAVIRUS / WUHAN VIRUS

If you have recently travelled to Wuhan, China and have a fever, difficulty breathing, a cough or sore throat please

DO NOT ENTER THE CLINIC.

Please call the practice and ask for Nurse Manager for advice on 9293 4455.

For further information on this virus please refer to following link:
https://www1.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/ohp-novel-coronavirus.htm

 

We welcome Dr Emma Vitale and Dr Rebecca Smailes to the Mead Medical team. 

Dr Emma Vitale

Emma began her career in medical research before taking a leap to study medicine at the University of Notre Dame. She graduated in 2016 and has worked in a number of medical and surgical specialties at a numerous hospitals around WA including Kalgoorlie before applying to for specialty training in General Practice. Emma has an interest in women’s health and sexual health and has completed extra training in these areas. She is also undertaking a Diploma of Child Health and working towards Fellowship with the Royal Australia College of General Practitioners. When she’s not at work, Emma enjoys being outdoors and recently completed a 6 day hike through the mountains in Tasmania.


Dr Rebecca Smailes

Dr Smailes was born and raised in Perth. In 2008 she moved to Melbourne and then completed her studies in medicine and surgery at Monash University in 2012. She then moved back to Perth to complete further training at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, SJOG Midland Hospital, Joondalup Health Campus, Osborne Park Hospital and Hollywood Private Hospital. In 2019 Dr Smailes finished her specialty training to attain fellowship with Royal Australian College of General Practitioners.

Dr Smailes’ particular areas of interest are women’s health (especially young women’s health and implanon insertion and removal), cardiology, chronic disease and diabetes management. Dr Smailes believes laughter is the best medicine and is known for her friendly consultation style.

Outside of doctoring, Dr Smailes enjoys hiking, taking her dog practically everywhere and spending time with friends and family.

Our beloved Dr Russell Tosh retired as a General Practitioner with Mead Medical on the 24th of December.

Dr Tosh was much loved and Iconic part of Mead Medical for 40 years and will be missed by staff, colleagues and patients.

We wish him all the best in his twilight years.

I’m Dr Leena Uppal from Mead Medical.

Medical Myth Busting and the Black Salve

Myth: Black salve can be used safely to treat skin cancer and other skin conditions naturally and effectively. This myth is responsible for serious harm and even death in some cases. The sale of Black Salve in Australia is illegal.  But-it is also easily available online from countries with less regulation. It most commonly it contains bloodroot and zinc Chloride. Zinc chloride is a synthetic corrosive chemical with nothing natural about it. This combination causes tissue destruction and scabbing and the dead tissue eventually sloughs away.

It has an interesting history.

In the 1850’s American surgeon, Jesse Fell popularised Fell’s Paste. He learned of bloodroot from the Native Americans and added in zinc chloride. On emigrating to London he briefly established a lucrative cancer practice using this paste but was soon ridiculed by the medical establishment.

In the 1920’s, Harry Hoxsey, an insurance salesman, began selling Hoxey’s Red Paste which had antimony trisulfide added to the bloodroot and zinc chloride. . Hoxsey opened 17 clinics across the US and treated thousands of patients-but the American Medical Association branded Hoxsey a fraud and the US FDA posted warnings about Hoxsey’s Paste in 46,000 US post offices!

In the 1930’s Dr Frederick Moh noted that zinc chloride fixed and histologically preserved skin in vivo. He patented a paste that contained stibnite and bloodroot and zinc chloride to help him map tumour margins. This technique was very successful but Dr Moh patented the paste to prevent it being used improperly as standalone therapy.

In 1975 Dr Almeida Goncalves, developed a paste with galangal + bloodroot + zinc chloride. He applied this salve for 24 hours to a lesion as well as 5-10mm of normal looking skin around it. Biopsies taken during 5-10 yr follow up showed no recurrences but there were high failure rates on initial application. Up to 38% BCCs and 21% SCCs failed to respond. Multiple applications were needed.  This suggests that treatment Black Salve is very risky and patients using Black Salve are at considerable risk of residual cancer if they do not have biopsies after salve application.

In the 1990’s Greg Caton formed Alpha Omega Labs, which made Black Salve. Caton served a US prison sentence for mail fraud and the introduction of new, unapproved drugs,  but after he got out of prison he moved to Ecuador where he still sells Black Salve online to the world, just outside US jurisdiction.

In summary, Black Salve is not natural, it is not cancer specific and it harms normal human tissue!

Medical Myth number one, busted.

Welcome Dr Celia Worth

We welcome Dr Celia Worth to the Mead Medical team. 

Dr Worth is a mother of two young children and completed her medical degree at the University of Queensland in 2008. She then she went on to complete five years of speciality training in obstetrics and gynaecology at predominantly Liverpool Hospital, a busy tertiary centre in Sydney.

In 2017 she made the difficult decision to follow her husband back to his home town in Perth and refocus her priorities to work life balance and being a mother.

Since that time she has been working as a career medical officer in obstetrics and gynaecology at Joondalup Hospital.

For now, she is working towards completing the general practitioner component of becoming a GP obstetrician but hopes to complete her specialist training in the future once her children are at school.

Celia is passionate about every aspect of women’s health and providing women with equitable access to all available resources, information and health care providers.

Her current aspirations include having another child, providing care to women with a holistic approach and locuming in remote areas of Western Australia to bridge the gap in health care provision for women.


Welcome back Dr Anna Dillon and Dr Sandy Braiuka

Dr Anna Dillon

We welcome back Dr Anna Dillon and Dr Sandy Braiuka who are returning to the Mead Medical team after finishing their training at other practices. 

Dr Anna Dillon initially qualified as a Physiotherapist in 2002 and worked in NZ, the UK and Australia before deciding to study medicine at Notre Dame in Fremantle. She graduated in 2012 and worked at Fremantle Hospital. While doing a GP term in Carnarvon she discovered her passion for general practice and womens health and she has subsequently undertaken 2 years of womens health training and is part of the Mead team who provide obstetric care at Bentley Hospital. Anna is passionate about all aspects of general practice with a particular interest in women’s health, sexual health, paediatrics, sports medicine and preventative health. Outside of work Anna and her partner are kept busy with their gorgeous infant son. She also enjoys running and mountain biking and exploring WA. 

Dr Sandy Braiuka

Dr Sandy Braiuka has enjoyed careers in many aspects of health care for over 30 years, including as a teacher, researcher, naturopath, kinesiologist and now as a Doctor. She has a special interest in sexual health, paediatrics, mental health, palliative care and all aspects of women’s health including antenatal care and insertion and removal of mirenas and implanons. Her passion is integrative medicine and the exploration of the mind-body connection through mindfulness, meditation and preventative health care. Outside of medicine, Sandy loves singing with the Gay and Lesbian choir and traveling to explore new places, cultures and food.

 

 


Goodbye Dr Helen Wilcox

We’re sad to advise that Dr Helen Wilcox has left Mead. She and her husband have made the decision to move their family back to the UK. Helen spent 6 years with us and will be sorely missed by patients, staff and fellow Doctors alike. We wish Helen and her family the best of luck for the next phase of their lives.

Today we welcome Dr Johan du Preez as a full time Doctor at Mead Medical.

Dr du Preez has been working with us on the weekends for some time, but as of today adds Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays & Fridays to his existing weekend sessions at Mead.

His interest lies in acute care and preventative care of acute/chronic disease processes across all age groups. He is well versed in skin checks and small procedures/excisions as well as acute injury management and is a strong believer in evidence based medicine.

Appointments with Dr du Preez can be made online via our website, via the Hot Doc app on your smartphone, or by calling 9293 4455 (Kalamunda) and 9453 6566 (Forrestfield).

Thank You!

Thank you Mead Community for your overwhelmingly generous and kind-hearted

COVID-19 and Telehealth Consults

Mead Medical is pleased to advise you that Medicare now permits Telehealth

Toilet Paper Panic

Toilet paper panic has probably been one of the more interesting and

Thank You!

Thank you Mead Community for your overwhelmingly generous and kind-hearted response to our previous blog post.  In less than 24 hours our 1 roll of toilet paper multiplied to over a hundred rolls in our overflowing baskets and the donations have continued. Please ask us for a roll if you are in need. Our toilet paper elves will be working hard over the next few weeks distributing to those in our community who can’t get out and about as freely.

Our new Telehealth consultation options can assist in social distancing to prevent community spread of the coronavirus. However in these times of great uncertainty and change it is important that our social retreat does not lead to social isolation. Now more than ever we need to reach out and connect with each other (using no-touch techniques of course) particularly with those who might be alone or anxious. There are many ways we can all do that. Phone a friend. Leave a little card in your neighbour’s letterbox letting them know if or how you could assist them if they were quarantined. Offer to collect someone’s mail, or shopping. Join an online community. Support your local business owners. Or be like the Italians and sing in your streets… and wash your hands.

Your generosity and community spirit continue to inspire us as we deal with coronavirus together. Fear and anxiety can drive us to become self-focussed and inward-looking. When we are afraid we have the tendency to tense against the unknown. It is hard to connect with generosity and open-heartedness when we are shut down and tight. But our global community also needs us. And we will only overcome this by working together. So, be an agent for spreading kindness. Donate blood. Share the dignity and buy an extra packet of sanitary products to add to the collection bins in your local supermarket for distribution to homeless women. Monitor your social media posts and spread love not fear. Ask for help. Be kind to one another… and keep washing your hands.

COVID-19 and Telehealth Consults

Mead Medical is pleased to advise you that Medicare now permits Telehealth consults for patients that have attended Mead Medical in the last 12 months and meet the following criteria:

  1. the person has been diagnosed with COVID-19 virus but who is not a patient of a hospital; or
  2. the person has been required to isolate themselves in quarantine in accordance with home isolation guidance issued by Australian Health Protection Principal Committee (AHPPC); or
  3. the person is considered more susceptible to the COVID-19 virus being a person who is:
    1. at least 70 years old; or
    2. at least 50 years old and is of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent; or
    3. is pregnant; or
    4. is a parent of a child under 12 months; or
    5. is already under treatment for chronic health conditions or is immune compromised; or
  4. the person meets the current national triage protocol criteria for suspected COVID-19 infection.

Our current protocol for conducting a Telehealth consultation is via phone commencing today.

Next week video conferencing will be available for selected GPs, which will require you to create a Skype account if you do not have one already.

Our protocol for making a Telehealth appointment is as follows:

  1. Call Mead Medical administration on 9293 4455 with your name, usual doctor, and Skype address or phone number.
  2. You are able to make Telehealth appointments online on HOTDOC.
  3. Please indicate at the time of booking if your consultation is urgent so that an earlier consultation can be arranged if possible.

Toilet Paper Panic

Toilet paper panic has probably been one of the more interesting and unexpected side effects of the coronavirus. It is a curious phenomenon that warrants further exploration. There are probably few of us who are unaffected. At my home we are down to our last 3 rolls. On my last 5 visits to the supermarket, I’ve not been able to buy more. But I’m a fit, healthy person with access to transport. And if it came down to it, I’d get by with soap and water… And stop shaking hands. Many of our patients at Mead are not so lucky. This week I’ve spoken to a heavily pregnant mum who doesn’t have the energy to drag her two year old around to multiple shopping centres in search of toilet paper. I’ve seen an elderly gentleman who relies on his carer to take him on a shopping outing for an hour once a week, miss out this week because there was no toilet paper to be found. Then there’s the 79 year old woman who urgently needs to prepare for her colonoscopy. But amidst these, there are also stories of hope, such as the 94 yr old patient who had a stranger with surplus, drop off a packet of toilet paper on her doorstep.

There’s no doubt we are living in uncertain times. The information (and misinformation) we receive about Corona virus changes on a daily basis. It seems inevitable that many of us will face a period of self-isolation. So it makes sense that you might want to have an adequate supply of toilet paper. But behind our wanting is a fear of lack, of not having enough. And this fear makes us small. It is a form of suffering that makes us want to hold on and grasp for what we don’t have. Panic buying can be seen as an attempt to assuage the fear, and to gain a sense of control in the vastly and rapidly changing landscape. However it fails to recognise that we are all in this together. We are community. We are connected. If some among us suffer, in the end, we all suffer.

I am inspired by the stories of hope and I invite you remember you are a valued part of our Mead community. I’ve brought one of my remaining toilet rolls and a basket to the reception area in our Kalamunda practice. I’d invite you to share the love… and the date roll or bog roll or whatever Aussie slang name you prefer to call it. Bring a roll to add to the collection. Please, if you have run out, take a roll, knowing that your community has your back… and your bum. With lots of handwashing of course.

Goodbye and Goodluck

Mead Medical staff and Directors would like to wish both Brooke and Tania the best of luck on their new journey in whatever they choose to do, thank you for all of your hard work and dedication to Mead over the years, you will be missed.

ALERT: CORONAVIRUS / WUHAN VIRUS

ALERT: CORONAVIRUS / WUHAN VIRUS

If you have recently travelled to Wuhan, China and have a fever, difficulty breathing, a cough or sore throat please

DO NOT ENTER THE CLINIC.

Please call the practice and ask for Nurse Manager for advice on 9293 4455.

For further information on this virus please refer to following link:
https://www1.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/ohp-novel-coronavirus.htm

 

New Doctor Updates

We welcome Dr Emma Vitale and Dr Rebecca Smailes to the Mead Medical team. 

Dr Emma Vitale

Emma began her career in medical research before taking a leap to study medicine at the University of Notre Dame. She graduated in 2016 and has worked in a number of medical and surgical specialties at a numerous hospitals around WA including Kalgoorlie before applying to for specialty training in General Practice. Emma has an interest in women’s health and sexual health and has completed extra training in these areas. She is also undertaking a Diploma of Child Health and working towards Fellowship with the Royal Australia College of General Practitioners. When she’s not at work, Emma enjoys being outdoors and recently completed a 6 day hike through the mountains in Tasmania.


Dr Rebecca Smailes

Dr Smailes was born and raised in Perth. In 2008 she moved to Melbourne and then completed her studies in medicine and surgery at Monash University in 2012. She then moved back to Perth to complete further training at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, SJOG Midland Hospital, Joondalup Health Campus, Osborne Park Hospital and Hollywood Private Hospital. In 2019 Dr Smailes finished her specialty training to attain fellowship with Royal Australian College of General Practitioners.

Dr Smailes’ particular areas of interest are women’s health (especially young women’s health and implanon insertion and removal), cardiology, chronic disease and diabetes management. Dr Smailes believes laughter is the best medicine and is known for her friendly consultation style.

Outside of doctoring, Dr Smailes enjoys hiking, taking her dog practically everywhere and spending time with friends and family.

End of an Era

Our beloved Dr Russell Tosh retired as a General Practitioner with Mead Medical on the 24th of December.

Dr Tosh was much loved and Iconic part of Mead Medical for 40 years and will be missed by staff, colleagues and patients.

We wish him all the best in his twilight years.

Medical Myth Busting and the Black Salve

I’m Dr Leena Uppal from Mead Medical.

Medical Myth Busting and the Black Salve

Myth: Black salve can be used safely to treat skin cancer and other skin conditions naturally and effectively. This myth is responsible for serious harm and even death in some cases. The sale of Black Salve in Australia is illegal.  But-it is also easily available online from countries with less regulation. It most commonly it contains bloodroot and zinc Chloride. Zinc chloride is a synthetic corrosive chemical with nothing natural about it. This combination causes tissue destruction and scabbing and the dead tissue eventually sloughs away.

It has an interesting history.

In the 1850’s American surgeon, Jesse Fell popularised Fell’s Paste. He learned of bloodroot from the Native Americans and added in zinc chloride. On emigrating to London he briefly established a lucrative cancer practice using this paste but was soon ridiculed by the medical establishment.

In the 1920’s, Harry Hoxsey, an insurance salesman, began selling Hoxey’s Red Paste which had antimony trisulfide added to the bloodroot and zinc chloride. . Hoxsey opened 17 clinics across the US and treated thousands of patients-but the American Medical Association branded Hoxsey a fraud and the US FDA posted warnings about Hoxsey’s Paste in 46,000 US post offices!

In the 1930’s Dr Frederick Moh noted that zinc chloride fixed and histologically preserved skin in vivo. He patented a paste that contained stibnite and bloodroot and zinc chloride to help him map tumour margins. This technique was very successful but Dr Moh patented the paste to prevent it being used improperly as standalone therapy.

In 1975 Dr Almeida Goncalves, developed a paste with galangal + bloodroot + zinc chloride. He applied this salve for 24 hours to a lesion as well as 5-10mm of normal looking skin around it. Biopsies taken during 5-10 yr follow up showed no recurrences but there were high failure rates on initial application. Up to 38% BCCs and 21% SCCs failed to respond. Multiple applications were needed.  This suggests that treatment Black Salve is very risky and patients using Black Salve are at considerable risk of residual cancer if they do not have biopsies after salve application.

In the 1990’s Greg Caton formed Alpha Omega Labs, which made Black Salve. Caton served a US prison sentence for mail fraud and the introduction of new, unapproved drugs,  but after he got out of prison he moved to Ecuador where he still sells Black Salve online to the world, just outside US jurisdiction.

In summary, Black Salve is not natural, it is not cancer specific and it harms normal human tissue!

Medical Myth number one, busted.

Doctor Updates

Welcome Dr Celia Worth

We welcome Dr Celia Worth to the Mead Medical team. 

Dr Worth is a mother of two young children and completed her medical degree at the University of Queensland in 2008. She then she went on to complete five years of speciality training in obstetrics and gynaecology at predominantly Liverpool Hospital, a busy tertiary centre in Sydney.

In 2017 she made the difficult decision to follow her husband back to his home town in Perth and refocus her priorities to work life balance and being a mother.

Since that time she has been working as a career medical officer in obstetrics and gynaecology at Joondalup Hospital.

For now, she is working towards completing the general practitioner component of becoming a GP obstetrician but hopes to complete her specialist training in the future once her children are at school.

Celia is passionate about every aspect of women’s health and providing women with equitable access to all available resources, information and health care providers.

Her current aspirations include having another child, providing care to women with a holistic approach and locuming in remote areas of Western Australia to bridge the gap in health care provision for women.


Welcome back Dr Anna Dillon and Dr Sandy Braiuka

Dr Anna Dillon

We welcome back Dr Anna Dillon and Dr Sandy Braiuka who are returning to the Mead Medical team after finishing their training at other practices. 

Dr Anna Dillon initially qualified as a Physiotherapist in 2002 and worked in NZ, the UK and Australia before deciding to study medicine at Notre Dame in Fremantle. She graduated in 2012 and worked at Fremantle Hospital. While doing a GP term in Carnarvon she discovered her passion for general practice and womens health and she has subsequently undertaken 2 years of womens health training and is part of the Mead team who provide obstetric care at Bentley Hospital. Anna is passionate about all aspects of general practice with a particular interest in women’s health, sexual health, paediatrics, sports medicine and preventative health. Outside of work Anna and her partner are kept busy with their gorgeous infant son. She also enjoys running and mountain biking and exploring WA. 

Dr Sandy Braiuka

Dr Sandy Braiuka has enjoyed careers in many aspects of health care for over 30 years, including as a teacher, researcher, naturopath, kinesiologist and now as a Doctor. She has a special interest in sexual health, paediatrics, mental health, palliative care and all aspects of women’s health including antenatal care and insertion and removal of mirenas and implanons. Her passion is integrative medicine and the exploration of the mind-body connection through mindfulness, meditation and preventative health care. Outside of medicine, Sandy loves singing with the Gay and Lesbian choir and traveling to explore new places, cultures and food.

 

 


Goodbye Dr Helen Wilcox

We’re sad to advise that Dr Helen Wilcox has left Mead. She and her husband have made the decision to move their family back to the UK. Helen spent 6 years with us and will be sorely missed by patients, staff and fellow Doctors alike. We wish Helen and her family the best of luck for the next phase of their lives.

Dr Johan du Preez – Now Full Time

Today we welcome Dr Johan du Preez as a full time Doctor at Mead Medical.

Dr du Preez has been working with us on the weekends for some time, but as of today adds Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays & Fridays to his existing weekend sessions at Mead.

His interest lies in acute care and preventative care of acute/chronic disease processes across all age groups. He is well versed in skin checks and small procedures/excisions as well as acute injury management and is a strong believer in evidence based medicine.

Appointments with Dr du Preez can be made online via our website, via the Hot Doc app on your smartphone, or by calling 9293 4455 (Kalamunda) and 9453 6566 (Forrestfield).

Latest News

Thank You!

Thank you Mead Community for your overwhelmingly generous and kind-hearted response to

COVID-19 and Telehealth Consults

Mead Medical is pleased to advise you that Medicare now permits Telehealth consults for

Toilet Paper Panic

Toilet paper panic has probably been one of the more interesting and unexpected side

Goodbye and Goodluck

Mead Medical staff and Directors would like to wish both Brooke and Tania the best of

ALERT: CORONAVIRUS / WUHAN VIRUS

ALERT: CORONAVIRUS / WUHAN VIRUS If you have recently travelled to Wuhan, China and

Subscribe for Updates